FTZ adaptor hates tripods, straps, and harnesses

The FTZ adaptor has a surprising and very frustrating design flaw – it’s impossible to mount it to the camera body when you have almost any kind of mounting plate, strap, or harness (e.g. Cotton Carrier) mount point attached to the camera body.  This is because the FTZ has a big fat foot, as can be seen in the above photo, which sticks down well below the bottom of the camera body.  Furthermore, the camera body’s tripod socket is very close to the front edge of the body – and thus the FTZ’s foot.  Anything you attach to the camera body’s tripod socket tends to stick out from the front of the camera’s body – a lot.  The FTZ’s fat foot collides with that, and makes it impossible to use both at the same time.

I suppose nominally you’re never supposed to use the camera body’s tripod mount when you have the FTZ attached, but that’s naive – if you’re going back and forth between native to adapted lenses, you’re not going to be constantly removing & reattaching things to tripod sockets.  At most you’d want to have the same widget in both the camera body’s and the FTZ’s tripod sockets, so that you always have one available irrespective of what lens you have attached.

I miss companies that gave some thought to having all their products work well together (this is just the latest example I’ve noticed in an increasing trend).

iOS 7 first impressions

I found this post in the ‘Drafts’ folder from 2013 – evidently I started writing, got distracted, and forgot about it.

It’s interesting to me even now because the aesthetics of iOS have been stuck in iOS 7 ever since.  I still don’t like the look, the design language, how many things operate – the interface is ugly, unintuitive, lacks personality, and – as the hosts of ATP might say – is absent the whimsy that defined Apple for decades.

It felt like a betrayal, too – now iOS, as of version 7, looked like a cheap Android rip-off.  Apple had wilfully and pointlessly thrown away their most important positive differentiators.  Insult was further added to injury by the mere existence of Windows Phone Metro, which – while still ugly to me too – at least demonstrated originality and a kind of bravery – it at least had a style, even if it wasn’t the one for me.

And it was dog slow.  It basically killed my love of the iPad, because it made my iPad 3 frustrating to use.  Even when I later got an iPad Air 2 (as a hand-me-down), my iPad love never really rekindled.

Nonetheless, I had been wondering for a few years: were I to go back now to iOS 6, would I be revolted & repulsed by it, and suddenly realise that iOS 7 and its ilk are in fact the current pinnacle of user interface & visual design?

A few months ago I got out my original iPad and turned it on.  It was running iOS 5, the last version of iOS support on it.  I hadn’t intended to go back in time – I’d forgotten entirely that it was pre-iOS 7.  I didn’t realise straight away, either.  My first thought, upon booting to the home screen, was “wow, this looks amazing”.  It genuinely took me a while to figure out why this non-Retina, decade-old, square & heavy iPad felt fantastic.

Then I realised – because it looks good and is easy to use.

Screenshot of iPad 3 home screen running iOS 6
The default iPad 3 home screen under iOS 6.  Admittedly prettier than on the original iPad, thanks to the Retina display, but you get the point nonetheless.
Screenshot courtesy of Dane Wirtzfeld via Flickr.

Without further ado, my until-now unpublished iOS 7 first impressions:

It’s buggy. The task switcher has a terrible time dealing with landscape orientation.

It’s slow. Both in general – perhaps just lacking some optimisations – and by apparent design flaws. e.g. many new animations are unnecessary to begin with, and unnecessarily slow to boot, and you can’t interact with things until the animation is done. It’s quickly frustrating.

The new slide-up gesture (for the little control sheet) steals scrolls periodically, which is exceedingly annoying. Perhaps in time I’ll recalibrate where I need to touch things in order to avoid that, but it’s annoying in the meantime.

Actually installing it was a pain and took multiple attempts, as per usual for any system restore. Le sigh.

Spelling correction is more aggressive now, and will even re-incorrect things after you explicitly fix them. Fucker.

To delete emails you now have to swipe the opposite direction – from right to left. No obvious reason, and certainly no indication on how to do that.

The new icons and dock design look like UI mocks. By someone who’s either not very good at them or just needs a really basic placeholder. They’re probably the most disappointing thing about iOS 7 so far.

The new lock screen is obtuse, as others have noted. The whole slide to unlock debacle is ridiculous and Apple has no excuse for it. But furthermore, it displays your chosen lock screen image arbitrarily cropped, and jitters it about randomly in what must be intended to be this infamous parallax effect, but in reality has no apparent relationship to the orientation of the iPad, and so just looks broken and stupid. Big cock-up all round there.

I love (meaning am tremendously sad) how certain aspects of those first impressions have lasted – some becoming huge memes of their own (e.g. damnyouautocorrect.com).  And how some parts of the iOS upgrade experience – like having to do the install repeatedly to get it to work – persist to this day.

tmutil is broken by SIP in Mojave

A diskutil bug unceremoniously erased an entire hard drive of mine a few weeks back.  While I was able to successfully (AFAICT) restore the drive’s contents to it from various backups, the erasure gave the drive a new identity (UUID, specifically).  The next time Time Machine ran, it compounded the diskutil bug by also unceremoniously deleting all my old backups (bar one, the latest), because it didn’t recognise the new drive with identical contents to the old drive as being the same drive, and tried to back it up again, requiring way more space, causing all existing backups to be purged, etc.

Sigh.

It turns out there’s actually a nominally supported way to address exactly this scenario – tmutil associatedisk (kudos to Simon Heimlicher for documenting this).  From the man page:

     associatedisk [-a] mount_point snapshot_volume

             Bind a snapshot volume directory to the specified local disk, thereby reconfigur-

             ing the backup history. Requires root privileges.

             In Mac OS X, HFS+ volumes have a persistent UUID that is assigned when the file

             system is created. Time Machine uses this identifier to make an association

             between a source volume and a snapshot volume. Erasing the source volume creates

             a new file system on the disk, and the previous UUID is not retained. The new

             UUID causes the source volume -> snapshot volume association to be broken. If one

             were just erasing the volume and starting over, it would likely be of no real

             consequence, and the new UUID would not be a concern; when erasing a volume in

             order to clone another volume to it, recreating the association may be desired.

             A concrete example of when and how you would use associatedisk:

             After having problems with a volume, you decide to erase it and manually restore

             its contents from a Time Machine backup or copy of another nature. (I.e., not via

             Time Machine System Restore or Migration Assistant.) On your next incremental

             backup, the data will be copied anew, as though none of it had been backed up

             before. Technically, it is true that the data has not been backed up, given the

             new UUID. However, this is probably not what you want Time Machine to do. You

             would then use associatedisk to reconfigure the backup so it appears that this

             volume has been backed up previously:

             thermopylae:~ thoth$ sudo tmutil associatedisk [-a] “/Volumes/MyNewStuffDisk”

             “/Volumes/Chronoton/Backups.backupdb/thermopylae/Latest/MyStuff”

             The result of the above command would associate the snapshot volume MyStuff in

             the specified snapshot with the source volume MyNewStuffDisk. The snapshot volume

             would also be renamed to match. The -a option tells associatedisk to find all

             snapshot volumes in the same machine directory that match the identity of

             MyStuff, and then perform the association on all of them.

Perfect – and I particularly like the subtext of the prose, which seems to be a subtle acknowledgment that this is a thing that happens frequently, and that macOS’s default behaviour is stupid… “recreating the association may be desired”.  No shit.

Unfortunately, that command doesn’t work in Mojave.  I’m apparently not the first person to notice.

It appears the tightened security, and in particular expansion of SIP to cover many more parts of the system including Time Machine backups, are to blame.  Even granting tmutil Full Disk Access etc in the system security settings is of no use (contrary to the stated purpose of Full Disk Access).

So you have to disable SIP first – which requires a reboot, obnoxiously – and only then does tmutil work again.  You’ll want to enable SIP again once you’re done, most likely, as the protections it provides are useful – it appears tmutil nve eeds to be updated to account for the new protections.