Things you find googling yourself

In no particular order.

  • The Hotline File Transfer Protocol v1.1.1.  I presume I was interested in, or actively doing, a third party Hotline client.  I did tend to make lots of data transfer clients back then (e.g. HTTP, FTP, even POP3 & SMTP).
  • My little gallery of childhood toys & memorabilia.  I hadn’t forgotten about this per se, but it’d certainly been a long time since I’d look at it.  In hindsight I’m really glad I took the time to take these photos – most of this stuff is long gone now, so the photos are all the remains to pique my nostalgia.
  • Apparently I discovered some ‘fix’ for Apple breaking dial-up modems in a Mac OS X Jaguar (10.2.4) update.  I vaguely recall that, though I’m pretty sure that’s not the only time I’ve had to fix stupid regressions in Mac OS X by reinstalling frameworks, kexts, etc from a prior OS build.  Sigh.
  • I’m listed in the National Park Foundation’s 2015 donor list.  I’m also in the 2016 one too, though it doesn’t show up in a web search [yet], and expect to be in the 2017 one as well.
  • Steven Troughton-Smith gives a call out to me (among others) in his little SceneKit demo program and his pretty impressive “OpenWorldTest” (i.e. Minecraft tech demo clone).  I don’t recall have any specific contribution, but way back when Steven & I did chat a bunch about SceneKit, and other topics.
    • It tickles me now, though I haven’t talked to Steven much in years, that his name appears increasingly often in pretty high profile places (e.g. the ATP podcast mentions him almost every episode lately).  He’s certainly made a name for himself.
    • Someone called “Taka Taka” has also run with OpenWorldTest a bit, to add VR support among other things.  Nothing to do with me any more than Steven’s original version – I mention it just because it’s cool.
  • I’m cited in the USF Maritime Law Journal (alas a broken link as I write).  Yep, I’m a big mover & shaker in the legal circle… which is to say, Marisa had an article published there and thanked me for supporting her as she wrote it. 😉
  • In reference to my hacking on CoreGraphicsServices, Nat! (no other name given, as far as I can see) wrote a journal entry about how some people in the Apple community can be, well, wet towels.
  • A bajillion years ago I wrote the Keychain Framework, a relatively clean ‘Cocoa’ (Objective-C & Foundation) framework that wrapped Apple’s C-based libraries for keychain access & basic security functionality (which is in turn an implementation & based on the CDSA ‘standard’ that nobody but Apple appears to have ever actually implemented).  Anyway, apparently it’s used in SQLEditor.  I’m pretty stoked – I sunk a spectacular amount of time into that framework, for very dubious benefit in hindsight. 😕
  • And another old pet project that shows up is my Mailcash plug-in for Apple Mail.  This was an implementation of Hashcash, which I still think is a neat idea for reducing email spam, by making senders ‘pay’ for every email like a virtual stamp.  I have no idea if anyone ever really adopted it, nor if my Apple Mail plug-in still works at all.  Presumably not – I recall Apple Mail breaking plug-ins repeatedly over the last ten years or so, since I wrote Mailcash.
    • Oh how easy it is to date an open-source project when it’s still hosted on Sourceforge.  Poor, sad, lost-its-way Sourceforge.

Curiously, there’s several other open-source projects of mine on Sourceforge that don’t show up in a web search for my name:

  • Build Installer, a template for software installers that build the software from source on the user’s machine – assuming they’ve installed Apple’s developer tools, that is.  From memory this was inspired by the tedious and error-prone nature of various open-source projects, w.r.t. how they distributed & installed their software on Mac OS X.  Sadly, nothing much has changed – there’s now brew & such package managers, but in my experience they make just as a big a mess as doing it manually & ad-hoc did.
  • DePC, a tool for stripping files of those nasty DOS-based file extensions, and instead setting the files’ type & creator codes correctly.  Sigh… I lost that battle.  To this day I still think that was a bad choice, that Apple made, to cave in to file extensions.  They’re still ugly and error-prone.
  • Mission to the ISS, the horrible group project I did with various folks in university, for the CSE32PRO (3rd-year Computer Science Project) class.  Back in 2004, I’d guess, based on the open-source release being in January 2005.  That was a fun project in many ways, though the end result was a bit embarrassing – we ran out of time, during the class, to actually finish it properly, so for example the underlying algorithms that control the simulation are fundamentally step-based, but are stepped every time the user provides any input, so high user interaction makes the simulation run faster than intended, with silly and sometimes outright broken results.  Sad panda.